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Cyberlaw and Business Report: Discussing the Internet of Things

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On Wednesday, February 4th, I joined Bennet Kelley on the Cyberlaw and Business Report to discuss the FTC’s recent staff report on the Internet of Things. We discussed some of the privacy implications of new wearables and smart technologies, as well as how traditional Fair Information Practices are under strain.

Ephemeral Communication and the Frankly App Podcast

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My former coworker was utterly enamored with Snapchat, on the grounds that she liked being able to express herself in ways that were not permanent.  In terms of our interpersonal relationships, it used to be that only diamonds were forever — now most of our text messages are, too.

Should a simple text last forever?  Last week, I reached out to Frankly, a new text-messaging app that provides for self-destructing texts, to talk about the development of the app and the future of ephemeral communication.

Click on the media player above to listen, or download the complete podcast MP3 here.

An Imbecilic Constitution Podcast

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September 17th is Constitution Day, a day of government-mandated celebration that some have argued is blatantly unconstitutional. Professor Nelson Lund has suggested that Constitution Day could be used as a day to critically examine our founding document, and inspired by his suggestion, I sought out to interview Sanford Levinson, who’s been a longtime critic of our Constitution.

In the first of what I’m going to call the “What Does Joe Know Show,” I speak to Professor Levinson about the current (or should I say ongoing?) crisis of governance in Washington, how the Constitution is to blame, and what comes next.

Want to download the MP3? Click here.

Digital Market Manipulation Podcast

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The other week, Rebecca Rosen wrote up a fantastic overview of Professor Ryan Calo’s new paper on “Digital Market Manipulation” in The Atlantic.  “What Does It Really Matter If Companies Are Tracking Us Online?” she provocatively asked in her headline.

Conveniently, I was scheduled to speak with Professor Calo about his essay Consumer Subject Review Boards — A Thought Experiment, which looks at how institutional review boards (IRBs) were put in place to ensure ethical human testing standards and suggests a similar framework could be brought to bear on consumer data projects.

I was able to ask him about the concept of digital market manipulation, which seems to move beyond mere “privacy” concerns into questions of fundamental fairness and equality.

From Cyberspace to Big Data Podcast

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In the run-up to the Future of Privacy Forum’s “Big Data and Privacy” workshop with the Stanford Center for Internet & Society, I’ve taken to podcasting again, speaking with scholars who couldn’t attend the conference.  First up was Professor Bill McGeveran, who prepared an essay looking over lessons from the 2000 Stanford symposium on “Cyberspace and Privacy: A New Legal Paradigm?”

Of course, now the buzzword has moved from cyberspace to big data.  McGeveran suggests big data is really seeing a replay of the same debates cyberspace saw a decade ago.  Among the parallels he highlights are (1) the propertization of data, (2) technological solutions like P3P, (4) First Amendment questions, and (4) the challenges posed by the privacy myopia.

ACS Law Talk Episode 11: The Future of LGBT Equality

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After many months, my former employer has posted an interview I conducted with Nan Hunter, an associate dean and constitutional law scholar at Georgetown Law Center, and Nancy Polikoff, a professor of law and an expert on sexuality and the law.  To mark the Supreme Court’s hearing of two cases impacting same-sex marriage, I spoke to the pair by phone to preview the arguments and what legal question comes next for the LGBT community.

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